Professional
Apprenticeship

Wildlife Conservation Apprenticeship in South Africa

Gain pivotal field experience on a private game reserve in the heart of the South African bush.

Durations: 24 weeks
Fieldwork hours50 hrs of fieldwork per week
Participant ratio1:6 staff to participant ratio
GVI experiencesIncludes GVI Experiences

Program information

Kick-start your conservation career when you join our six-month wildlife conservation internship in Limpopo, South Africa. Learn techniques used by private game reserves and international organisations to conduct wildlife research. Spend your first three months working on real conservation projects. Then put your new skills into practice with a career-boosting three-month work placement.

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Travel flexibility. Transfer for free up to 45 days before travel. Because life happens. Terms and conditions apply.
Overview
Dates & Prices
Itinerary
What's Included
Life On Base
Experiences
New
Free time & cultural immersion
Speak to alumni
MEET THE TEAM
Parent Info
Arrivals
Flights
Your Impact
publications
Our Ethics
Program ethics
Qualifications & Training Options
Careers
Support & Safety

Program overview

Travel to the savannah of South Africa where you’ll work alongside our international research team in a private nature reserve, one hour from Kruger National Park. Working in partnership with highly reputable local and international conservation organisations, like Rhino Revolution and EarthRanger, you’ll learn how to identify predators, like lions, cheetahs, and leopards, as well as megaherbivores like elephants, buffalo and rhinos. Put your training into practice when you complete a three-month work placement at a South African conservation organisation.

Please note the hours in the field may be long, which can be tiring in the heat of the African sun.

As part of your apprenticeship, you’ll take part in community development initiatives. Through GVI’s partnerships with local schools and education centres, participants play a role in education-focused projects. These projects aim to boost community involvement and strengthen the connections between people and wildlife.

Highlights

Work placement
Work placement
Qualify for a 3-month work placement with GVI or one of our partner organisations, kick-starting your career in conservation or animal rehabilitation.
Hear the call of the wild
Hear the call of the wild
Get the full safari experience in South Africa with this chance to work with and live among some of the world’s most beautiful and vulnerable species.
Kick-start your career
Kick-start your career
Participate in three months of intensive fieldwork training to ensure you’re ready to launch directly into your conservation career.
Get a job placement
Get a job placement
Work for a conservation partner for three months to get real practical experience and build a network of industry contacts.
Fast-track experience
Fast-track experience
Join a targeted career-readiness program that’s based on two decades of experience to grow your leadership and career skills.
Career guarantee
Career guarantee
Our comprehensive apprenticeships guarantee a job offer within 18 months upon completion of all program components and meeting eligibility criteria.
Advance your career
Advance your career
Gain international experience, receive four recognised qualifications and get a LinkedIn reference to boost your CV.
Get the edge
Get the edge
We know what it takes to work in conservation – that’s why our apprenticeships qualify for preferential recruitment when applying for GVI vacancies.

Is this program for me?

This internship is specifically useful for someone who has or is actively studying the below subject areas at school, university or college, or has an interest in these subject areas.

  • Ecology
  • Population biology
  • Epidemiology
  • Biology
  • Environmental science
  • Wildlife management
  • Zoology
  • Animal husbandry
  • Botany
  • Ecology and evolution
  • Geology
  • Wildlife biology and conservation

Activities

Some of the example typical activities you could participate in on this program.

Expert training
Expert training
Learn from Field Guide Association of South Africa qualified guides and master radio telemetry tracking skills to record animal movements.
Fieldwork training
Fieldwork training
Learn how to identify species, conduct surveys and track animals, including the Big 5.Collect to build an inventory of species in the reserve.
Focus species monitoring
Focus species monitoring
Collect data on lions, leopards, rhinos, elephants, buffalo, cheetahs and spotted hyenas.
Ongoing project work
Ongoing project work
Assist with invertebrate and bird surveys, practical conservation, citizen science databases, and community environmental education materials.
Fast-track training
Fast-track training
Complete various courses, including Impact and Ethics, Intro to Project Management, Effective Communication and Leading Teams for Impact.
Leadership responsibilities
Leadership responsibilities
Take on additional tasks like updating species identification kits or analysing data collected on endemic birds and invertebrates on the reserve.
Personal project
Personal project
Work on an individual project that aligns with your personal interests.
Mentorship
Mentorship
Meet weekly in a small group with other interns and an experienced mentor to receive project guidance and feedback on your leadership style.
Work placement
Work placement
Working directly with conservation organisations and local communities, you’ll gain practical experience with equipment and data collection.

Skills

  • Data collection
  • Data entry
  • Population ecology
  • Species identification
  • Survey research
  • VHF telemetry

Partners

Some of the partners we work with on base.

Karongwe Game Reserve Association
BirdLife South Africa (SABAP2)
EarthRanger
Elephants Alive (ad-hoc basis)
Endangered Wildlife Trust (ad-hoc basis)
Kruger2Canyons Biosphere
Wildlife Protection Solutions
Rhino Revolution
Mabula Ground Hornbill Project: Lowveld Expansion
Metapopulation Initiative
Global Conservation Corps
Hoedspruit Reptile Centre

Program details

Dates and prices

Select a start date:

Hot summer savings!

Book in May and get up to 15% off selected programs.

Secure your spot before spaces fill up.
Payment plans. Flexible payment plans allow you to pay in instalments.

What happens next?

Once you apply, a personal Enrollment Manager will be assigned to walk you through the rest of the process.

Itinerary

The following itinerary is an example of the activities and project work that participants might get involved in on this program. More specific details of the program are finalised several months before each start date.

05:00

Set off on a game drive as the sun rises above the Drakensberg. You'll learn how to monitor focus species, note down data and use telemetry equipment.

09:30

Head back to base where you’ll prepare and enjoy breakfast with the team.

10:00

Attend lectures on conservation, work on your internship or research project, or use the free time to further your knowledge on birds and mammals.

12:30

Eat lunch as a group, with participants preparing diverse meals, allowing you to taste international and South African cuisine.

13:30

Enjoy some quiet time after lunch to rest. For interns, study sessions and lectures or tests are often done as a group.

15:00

Enjoy an afternoon game drive. If you're lucky you might see a herd of elephant, a solitary rhino, or a leopard with its kill.

19:00

After dinner it’s time to relax. Hang out with your new friends in the common areas, play games, or even do some studying if you feel like it.

20:30

Time to call it a night with our early start. Get ready for a restful night's sleep and dream about all the exciting stuff tomorrow holds.

What’s included?

What's included
General
Food
Safe and basic accommodation (usually shared)
Airport pick up (unless stated)
All project equipment
24-hour in-country support from local staff
24-hour emergency desk
GVI Experiences
Activities
Sustainable project work
Data collection and research
Leadership responsibilities
Personal project
Placement
12-week placement
Mentorship
Weekly group sessions
Internship supervisor guidance
Pre-program training
Pre-departure webinar
Pre-departure training (online)
University of Richmond endorsed specialisation course
University of Richmond endorsed leadership course
Welcome training
GVI welcome presentation
Health & safety
Local culture & environment
UN SDGs
Impact & ethics
Child protection
Advanced leadership training
Personal development record
Project planning and management
Fast track training
Self-leadership and well-being
Project management
Ethical engagement
Measuring impact
Developing intercultural competence
Effective communication (storytelling and social media)
Team management
Participant journey
Off-site safety management
Safety management in practice (OSSM part 2)
Standards, policies and procedures
Emergency first response (select hubs)
Career services
University of Richmond careers course
Career coaching sessions (x2)
Career guarantee
LinkedIn reference – upon request
Job portal
Preferential recruitment on GVI positions
Certificates
Program certificate
University certificate – specialisation (University of Richmond)
University certificate – leadership (University of Richmond)
University certificate – careers (University of Richmond)
Fast track training certificate
What's excluded
Not included
Flights
International and domestic airport taxes
Medical and travel insurance
Visa costs
Police or background check
Personal items and toiletries
Additional drinks and gratuities

Life On Base

Live in the heart of the South African savannah, sharing a renovated farmhouse with qualified guides from the Field Guides Association of Southern Africa, other GVI staff, and participants from around the world. The base is incredibly remote, and tourists are unable to visit. Completely open to the bush and close to a dam, animals frequently visit the property, including elephants, buffalo, impala and leopards. 

Boasting more than 20 thousand acres of open savannah, our research station in Limpopo features some of the best wildlife viewing of any private South African game reserve. It’s home to all of the Big Five, including the elusive leopard, as well as cheetahs and spotted hyenas.

Rise each morning to the sound of African birdsong at dawn, before heading out in an open-topped safari vehicle to conduct research vital for the conservation of key predator species, like cheetahs and lions. Heading back to camp when the sun is at its height, you’ll input data, study, assist with cooking or tidying, or relax with the team in our shared outdoor social space. In the early afternoon, when the sun starts to set over the Drakensberg mountain range, you’ll head out again to conduct further research. Returning when the stars are at their brightest, you’ll share a meal and the day’s stories with your team. In your free time, visit Kruger National Park, an hour’s drive from your accommodation, travel to the scenic Panorama Route, which takes you through the magnificent Blyde River Canyon, or spend some time in the local town called Hoedspruit.

With one of most biodiverse ecosystems in the world, and home to many of the most threatened African wildlife species, South Africa is a nature, wildlife, and adventure lover’s paradise.

Accommodation

Lodgings consist of large dorm-style rooms with shared bathrooms. The base is solar-powered to ensure less impact on the environment. When it’s time to relax, there are hammocks, a...

Transportation

Transport to conduct field research is provided by our vehicles and drivers. We have one 15-seater taxi for organised transfers, which includes weekly trips into town, fortnightly ...

Communication

Our base has good connection to local cell phone towers, and participants with unlocked mobile devices can purchase local SIM cards during weekly trips into town. There is Wi-Fi av...

Meals

Participants make their own breakfast, which is continental style, including bread and spreads. For lunch, it’s usually sandwiches and salads. Dinner might be anything from a tradi...

Climate

Limpopo is well-known for its warm climate. Sunny days and low rainfall are the norm on most days throughout the year. Summer, starting in October and ending around March, coincide...

GVI experiences included in your program, at no extra cost.

Offered once a month, expand your adventure with GVI Experiences. These are just some of the activities offered on your program!

We want you to make the most of the chance to live in – and contribute towards –  the most diverse and unique wildernesses and communities on earth. Introducing GVI Experiences – immersive adventure, cultural and wellness activities exclusive to GVI that have been specially designed in collaboration with our local partners to support and stimulate sustainable economic development. 

Enhance your impact. Expand your adventure. Explore your world.

Discover the medicinal uses of indigenous plants
Discover the medicinal uses of indigenous plants
Herbal remedies
Master basic bush survival skills
Master basic bush survival skills
Into the wild
Watch a magical sunset at a watering hole
Watch a magical sunset at a watering hole
Golden hour
 Enjoy a night sky safari
Enjoy a night sky safari
Written in the stars

Free time & cultural immersion

By joining a GVI program, you not only contribute to preserving unique ecosystems but also get the chance to explore the surrounding area or venture further to see what else the region has to offer on weekends.

Our field staff are a great source of advice on local travel options. Many participants choose to travel before or after their experience, solidifying friendships made on the program. 

Engaging with a new context teaches global awareness, adaptability and critical thinking – skills highly valued in today’s world. Cultural immersion is encouraged, and there are many activities to enjoy during your free time or before and after your program. Please note, these suggestions aren’t included in the program fee and are at your own expense.

Cooking

From a fisherman’s meal of fish and chips to a spicy curry with naan, the diversity of South Africa lives in the dishes available in most communities, towns, and cities. Be sure to...

Religion

The most dominant religion in South Africa is Christianity. As a land of acceptance and diversity, you will find many people of different faiths, from Hinduism to Islam, along with...

Limpopo

The northernmost region of South Africa and home to the Kruger National Park, the Limpopo province features some of the best opportunities for wildlife in Southern Africa. It is sp...

South Africa

Possessing one of the highest biodiversities in the world and the home to many of the most threatened African wildlife, South Africa is a nature, wildlife, and adventure lover’s pa...

Weekend trips

Panorama route

The Panorama Route in Mpumalanga province is one of the most scenic parts of South Africa. It runs along the eastern edge of the Drakensberg, the same mountains which are home to t...

Kruger National Park

Choose your adventure: a solo self-drive or team up with a skilled guide in a custom open safari vehicle (OSV). Opt for a day trip or an overnight stay at one of the rest camps wit...

Further travels

Zululand

Further south, In the province of KwaZulu-Natal, you’ll find the historic Zululand, as well as the grave and memorial of the famous leader, King Shaka.

Durban

Experience the unique cultural milieu of the coastal town of Durban. On the coast of the Indian Ocean, its warm waters make the city a haven for surfers.

Cape Town

Watch the sunset from the top of Table Mountain (you can hike to the top or take the cableway up and down) or walk the circular route to the top of Lion’s Head. Visit one of the ci...

Kalahari Desert

The rusty sandy expanse of the Kalahari stretches from South Africa to Namibia and Botswana. Home to dunes reaching the heights of several buildings and a diverse range of wildlife...

Bungee jumping and ziplining

The Drakensberg mountain range is dotted with canyons, and many people experience the exhilarating thrill of bungee jumping for the first time here. If you aren’t ready to dive hea...

Skiing

South Africa might not be top of mind when considering skiing destinations. Tiffindell Ski Resort in the Drakensberg is South Africa’s only ski and snowboarding resort, with snow f...

National parks

There are 19 national parks you can visit during your stay in South Africa. Run by South African National Parks (SANParks) the closest park to us is the famous Kruger National Park...

Speak to alumni

If you’d like to find out what the experience of joining a GVI project is really like, simply contact us and we’ll put you in touch with one of our many Alumni.

We’ll try to match you to an Alum based on your location, nationality, age, stage of academic career, gender, and program interests. This allows you to gain insights into the experience that is most relevant to you.

Depending on your location you might be able to speak to an Alum over the phone or online, or meet up with them face-to-face at a coffee shop nearby. We also run a series of small events around the world where you can speak to GVI Alumni, Ambassadors and staff members.

Get a first-hand perspective

Meet us

Meet the team

Get acquainted with the GVI Africa, South Africa, Limpopo family

Sophie Pyper

Program Manager

This is Sophie, she is our Program Manager at GVI Limpopo here in South Africa. Originally from Northern Ireland, Sophie’s journey with GVI start ...

Parent Info

‘If only every student could do this. It changes your life in all the right ways,’ says Chris Heritage, parent of Luke Heritage, one of our teen volunteers who has participated on two GVI programs, one in Costa Rica and another in South Africa.

We are a parent-run organisation that is incredibly serious about health and safety, and increasing the impact, as well as the long-term career benefits of our programs. Our programs help young people develop the skills to select a career path that is personally fulfilling, and live a life aligned to the well-being of our planet and the global community.

GVI is a proud member of the Gap Year Association.

Ken and Linda Jeffrey, whose son Sam volunteered with GVI in Thailand, talk about how the experience affected Sam. He also went on to volunteer with GVI again in South Africa. ‘I know it sounds like a cliche but in a sense, he did go away as a boy and he came back as a young man. Both of us could recommend GVI without any hesitation to any other parent thinking about exploring an opportunity for their children to explore the world and to see different parts of it.’

Parent Info Pack

Download the Parent Pack and learn more about:

Our staff: All our projects are run by staff, selected, vetted, trained, and managed by our central office.
Health and safety: Our safety practices include a child and vulnerable adult protection policy and high participant ratios.
Staying in touch: See what’s happening on base, by following a hub’s dedicated Facebook page.
Free parent consultations: We would love to talk to you about exciting opportunities available for your child.

Arrivals

When it comes to support, we ensure that each participant is provided with unparalleled, 360 degree support, from your initial contact with the GVI Family, all the way through your program, and even after, as you become part of the GVI Alumni Team.

As part of this promise, we will ensure, whenever possible, that one of our dedicated staff will be available to meet you at the airport. In most locations, we also set up a Whatsapp group to help with managing airport arrivals.

We will arrange with you prior to your departure that, should you arrive in the agreed upon pick up window, a member of our staff will be there to welcome you, easily identifiable in a GVI t-shirt or holding a GVI sign and wearing a friendly smile.

This means there will be someone there to greet you as you land, and from there you will be transported to your GVI base to start your adventure and meet the rest of your team.

Your Impact

All of our programs have short-, mid- and long-term objectives that align with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs). This enables us to report on our collaborative impact across the world in a streamlined manner, measuring which UN SDGs we are making a substantial contribution to. Furthermore, this will help our local partners and communities measure and visualise their contribution to the UN SDGs.

Prior to your arrival on base, you will be educated about the UN SDGs. Then once you arrive on base, you’ll learn about the specific goals we have in this particular location, our various objectives, and also clarification of how your personal, shorter-term involvement contributes to these.

Our aim is to educate you on local and global issues, so that you continue to be an active global citizen after your program, helping to fulfil our mission of building a global network of people united by their passion to make a difference.

Many of Africa’s wildlife species are under threat. Private reserves, like Karongwe, where we run our conservation projects, are a haven for at-risk species. Karongwe is located within the UNESCO protected Kruger to Canyons Biosphere Reserve. This biosphere represents only 1.4% of South Africa’s land, but contains 55% of the total natural life found here.

Karongwe Private Game Reserve

Karongwe Private Game Reserve was once made up of individual farms. In 1998 the landowners banded together and created an 8,500 hectare game reserve. In 2001 GVI was brought onto Karongwe to assist the Karongwe Ecological Research Institute (KERI) in their monitoring of the large predators and herbivores on the reserve. In 2006, GVI Limpopo took over this role. This helps reserve management understand the impact of predators on the prey species, and maintain a healthy ecosystem by ensuring a balance of natural resources. Predators are often tracked using telemetry, or monitored using camera trapping. Through this we learn how they use the space within the reserve, what their feeding behaviour is like, how they interact with one another and other predators. Herbivores might be counted, their numbers, age, and sex listed, and their impact on vegetation noted. This data is presented to Karongwe management and landowners on a weekly, monthly, half-yearly and yearly basis. We also assist with anti-poaching efforts by monitoring and recording the movements of individual rhino on the reserve through the use of our ID kits. Sometimes we assist with the upkeep of the reserve’s fences and roads. We also assist with removing old farm infrastructure and invasive alien plant species, and work on soil rehabilitation to help with habitat recovery.

Cheetah Research and Conservation

Cheetahs are a species listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List Of Threatened Species. They are a rather fragile species as they naturally have a low genetic diversity and are not able to compete well with other larger, stronger predators like lions and hyenas. One aspect of our study focuses on how cheetahs make use of their kill, as well as prey preference. We record how much time the cheetahs spend on their fresh kill as well as what potentially encourages them to leave. This helps to know how they are dealing with competition with other predators. We also collect data on breeding success and interactions with other predators.

Bird Research and Conservation

We also contribute to the South African Bird Atlas Project (SABAP2), one of the most important bird monitoring projects in Southern Africa – and its largest citizen science database. Because they are popular and well-studied, birds are appropriate indicators of ecosystem health. The availability of significant, long-term datasets in South Africa makes birds a good choice for an early-warning system for climate change impacts and other systematic, ecosystem-wide threats to broader biodiversity. The number of critically endangered birds in South Africa has increased from 5 in 2000 to 13 in 2017. One group in particular features particularly dramatic statistics: 22 of the 79 raptors occurring in the northeastern region of the country are now considered threatened. Of concern are the low numbers of scavenging raptors. Most of South Africa’s vulture species, as well as the tawny eagle and the bateleur (two obligate scavengers), are listed as endangered or critically endangered. In December 2016, SABAP2 featured 9 million records across 17,339 pentads, 5 minutes of latitude by 5 minutes of longitude, squares with sides of roughly 9 kilometres, in South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini. The selection of sites and habitats critical to bird conservation rely on this data. All other conservation initiatives depend on the results of the bird atlas, to a greater or lesser extent. One cannot determine the conservation status of a species unless you know its range and how this is changing.

Environmental Education

We also conduct environmental education programs at one primary school and one day care centre in the area. We make ourselves available for conservation-focused mini-projects. This might include documenting bird of prey nesting sites or the creation of lists for microfauna species in the reserve. In the past we have partnered with a range of conservation organisations, as well as academic institutions like the University of Cape Town, the University of Pretoria, and Bournemouth University. Exact project details are also always subject to change due to weather conditions, time of year, and animal movements. As the requirements of our partners change over time, so do the details of our projects.
The specific United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (UN SDG) we work on in Limpopo is Goal 15: Life On Land.

Over the past 21 years, GVI Limpopo has:

1. Presented at over 70 land owner meetings.
2. Assisted more than 1,200 children in learning about the environment and wildlife (since 2014).
3. Constructed 3 day care centres (since 2015).
4. Recruited 17 national scholarship students (since 2013).
5. Taken more than 300 learners on game drives.
6. Supported over 20 partner organisations.
7. Published 17 peer-reviewed papers.
8. Placed tracking devices on 25 individual animals, including cheetahs, lions, hyenas, leopards and wild dogs.
9. Monitored 375 individual animals and rare game.
10. Assisted with over 25 rhino dehorning events.
11. Raised over £46,000.
12. Hundreds of participants have passed through our doors, and many have gone on to have careers in wildlife conservation (or another aspect of the natural environment), due to the experience gained with us.

Project objectives

 

GVI Limpopo’s Long-term Objectives:

1. Provide long-term and consistent data for the Karongwe Game Reserve Association to assist them in making decisions based on scientific data.

2. Increase local awareness of GVI’s purpose and impact on Karongwe PGR.

3. Increase scientific output.

4. Contribute to three large-scale reserve management projects alongside the warden in accordance with the reserve’s management plan.

5. Increase our in-country capacity by providing environmental and conservation education and training, and through community upliftment projects.

Publications

The best decisions in international development and conservation cannot be made without accurate and up-to-date data or informed research. Our many field teams around the world collaborate with local and international partners to analyse data and draw conclusions. In addition, many of our participants have used research they have collected on their various GVI projects to complete their Masters, Doctorate, or postdoctoral studies. We also run a fellowship program which connects postdoctoral researchers at globally-respected universities with our many sustainable development programs around the world to support their research and ensure continuous improvement of our best practices on base.

All of our publications are on Google Scholar
Google Scholar
View publications
Impacts of African savannah elephants (Loxodonta africana) on tall trees and their recovery within a small, fenced reserve in South Africa
Peer-reviewed scientific publication
2022
Author(s)
Kaite Elizabeth Thompson, Andrew Ford, Genoveva Esteban, Angelo Poupard, Kayla Zoon, Nathalie Pettorelli
GVI South Africa Limpopo Annual Report 2018
Annual Report
2018
Author(s)
Leah Brown
‘Anthropogenic effects on wildlife: Do anthropogenic features affect African elephant (Loxodonta africana) space use in a small, protected area?’
Scientific Publication

Master of Arts in Conservation Biology, thesis

Author(s)
Katherine (Kaggie) Orrick
‘Resource partitioning of sympatric small mammals in and Africa forest-grassland vegetation mosaic.’
Peer Reviewed Article

Austral Ecology

Author(s)
Craig T. Symes (1), John W. Wilson (2), Stephan m. Woodborne (1, 3), Zara S. Shaikh (4) and Michael Scantlebury (5)
‘Wildlife road traffic accidents: a standardized protocol forv counting flattened fauna.’
Scientific Publication
2014

Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd (Open access)

Author(s)
1: The Endangered Wildlife Trust, Johannesburg, South Africa 2: Wildlife and Reserve Management Research Group, Department of Zoology and Entomology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa 3: Department of Nature Conservation, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa
‘Rapid growth rates of lion (Panthera leo) populations in small, fenced reserves in South Africa: a management dilemma’
Scientific Publication
2014

South African Journal of Wildlife Research

Author(s)
Susan M. Miller & Paul J. Funston
‘Flexible energetics of cheetah hunting strategies provide resistance against kleptoparasitism.’
Scientific Publication
2014

Science 346, 79 (2014)

Author(s)
David M. Scantlebury,1* Michael G. L. Mills,2,3 Rory P. Wilson,4 John W. Wilson,5,6 Margaret E. J. Mills,2 Sarah M. Durant,7 Nigel C. Bennett,8 Peter Bradford,9 Nikki J. Marks,1 John R. Speakman10,11
‘Occurrence, Diet and Management of the Invasive Lionfish Pterios spp. in the Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve, Quintana Roo, Mexico’
Conference Poster
2013

Poster abstract for RCUK conference

Author(s)
Fulton, S. And Ponce-Taylor, D.
‘Moving to stay in place - behavioural mechanisms for coexistence of African large carnivores.’
Scientific Publication
2013

Ecological Society of America: Preprint

Author(s)
Abi Tamim Vanak, Daniel Fortin, Maira Thakar, Monika Ogden, Cailey Owen, Sophie Greatwood, Rob Slotow
‘An investigation into the distribution of ground dwelling mammals on Mariepskop Mountain, Drakensberg, South Africa.’
Scientific Publication
2012

Dissertation – BSc Ecology

Author(s)
Dawson, Emily
‘The feeding ecology of Loxodonta Africana: Vegetation selection and foraging impacts.’
Scientific Publication
2012

BSc Dissertation

Author(s)
Leanne Doran
‘Quantifying resource partitioning on a South African forest-grassland small mammal community using stable isotopes.’
Scientific Publication
2011

Austal Ecology: In Press

Author(s)
Symes CT, Wilson JW, Woodborne SM, Shaikh Z & Scantlebury M
‘Minimum prey and area requirements of the Vulnerable cheetah Acinonyx jubatus: implications for reintroduction and management of the species in South Africa.’
Scientific Publication
2011

Oryx

Author(s)
P. Lindsey, CJ Tambling, R Brummer, H. Davie-Mostert, M. Hayward, K. Marnewick & D Parker
‘Minimizing predation risk in a landscape of multiple predators: effects on the spatial distribution of African ungulates.’
Peer Reviewed Article
2011

Ecology

Author(s)
Thaker M, Vanak A and Owen C
‘Importance of scavenging food from animal carcasses in human evolution.’
Scientific Publication
2011

BSc Dissertation

Author(s)
Emma Staniforth
‘Observations on the factors that influence the movement and habitat choices of zebra (Equus quagga) in Karongwe Game Reserve, South Africa.’
Peer Reviewed Article
2011

Dissertation – BSc Equine Studies June 2011

Author(s)
Georgina Baldry
‘Minimizing predation risk in a landscape of multiple predators: effects on the spatial distribution of African ungulates.’
Peer Reviewed Article
2011

Ecology

Author(s)
Maria Thakar (1), Abi T. Vanak (1, 2), Cailey Owen (1, 2), Monika B. Ogden (2), Sophie m. Niemann (1) and Rob Slotow (1)
‘The response of small mammals to natural - and human-altered edges associated with Afromontane forests of South Africa.’
Scientific Publication
2010

Forest Ecology & Management

Author(s)
Wilson JW, Stirnemann RL, Shaikh Z & Scantlebury
‘Copulatory parameters and reproductive success of wild leopards in South Africa.’
Scientific Publication
2010

Journal of Mammalogy

Author(s)
Cailey Owen, Sophie Niemann, and Rob Slotow
‘Lion conservation on small game reserves in South Africa: a metapopulation approach.’
Scientific Publication
2010

DTech Nature Conservation Thesis

Author(s)
Susan Miller
‘Group Dynamics of Zebra and Wildebeest in a Woodland Savanna: Effects of Predation Risk and Habitat Density’
Peer Reviewed Article
2010

PLoS ONE

Author(s)
Maria Thakar (1), Abi T. Vanak (1, 2), Cailey Owen (1, 2), Monika B. Ogden (2), and Rob Slotow (1)
‘Reproductive biology of a pride of lions on Karongwe Game Reserve.’
Scientific Publications
2008

African Zoology

Author(s)
Monika B. Lehmann, Paul J Funston, Cailey R. Owen and Rob Slotow
‘Home Range Utilisation and Territorial Behaviour of Lions (Panthera leo) on Karongwe Game Reserve, South Africa’
Peer Reviewed Article
2008

PLoS ONE

Author(s)
Monika B. Lehmann (1, 2), Paul J. Funston (1), Cailey Owen (2, 3) and Rob Slotow (3)
‘The behavioural ecology of a solitary lion pride in Karongwe Game Reserve’
Scientific Publication
2007

Mtech Nature Conservation

Author(s)
Monika B. Lehmann
‘The effects of land use and other anthropogenic effects on the population dynamics and behaviour of small mammal communities in the Limpopo Province.’
Scientific Publication
2017

Master of  Science (title TBC) – thesis

Author(s)
Jawi Ramahlo

Our Ethics

Below is a list of core ethics and best practices we believe are essential to the operation of high quality, ethical volunteer and sustainable development programs. We believe that all responsible volunteer and sustainable development operations should focus upon these principles. If you are considering volunteering, these are some of the key considerations you should question, to ensure that your time and money contributes towards positive change.

 

We want to constantly develop our own understanding of ethical best practice. In so doing, we aim to provide an exemplary industry standard for other education institutions, international development organisations, and social enterprises. Our Badge of Ethics stands for the drive to always do good, better. Find out more, click on the Badge below.