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New Photographic evidence for the AOCR

By 6 years ago
Categories Jalova
During my time on the expedition, I was lucky enough to make some very unusual bird sightings – species that were exceedingly rare for the area ranging from migrant species (Cape May Warbler, Northern Parula) to those that appear to be expanding their range (Yellow-headed Caracara). Thanks to the photos I was able to take and my field notes, I was able to submit these sightings to the Costa Rican Ornithologist’s Association, where they were all officially accepted by their committee. I also submitted an article to them summarising the observations made on the expedition during 2010, which is due to be published in the upcoming November edition of their magazine, Zeledonia (viewable free at www.avesdecostarica.org/?q=content/revista-zeledonia).

(Yellow-throated Warbler)

In addition to this, two of the species of migrant warbler recorded (Yellow-throated Warber Setophaga dominica and Northern Parula Setophaga americana) were on the official list of bird species in Costa Rica as ‘without voucher’. This meant that though they have been recorded before (rarely) there was no photographic evidence on record. I had photos of both of these species (two individuals in fact of the Northern Parula) and though they are far from professional standard, they are more than adequate for identification purposes, and these photos have now been accepted as part of the photographic archive of the Costa Rica Museum of Natural History!

(Northern Parula – Male)

(Note to all current expedition members – this is the perfect time of year for species like this to arrive from North America and they were both found in the garden of the Research Station – so get your cameras out and get looking. You never know when the next rarity will turn up!)

GVI has been able to achieve a huge amount since its move to the Jalova base and undoubtedly will continue to provide both an incredible experience to all participants and a steady flow of important biological data. Thank you to all staff and volunteers that have taken part in this expedition so far, and to all of you that helped make 2010 an amazing year for me personally. I hope to return one day.

Jonathan Groom, former Field Staff.